About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
MSNBC 16
CNN 2
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
LANGUAGE
English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 point. it mentioned it opened down nearly 300 points earlier. today one of the biggest aftershocks to hit japan s
ahead. >>> also the disaster in japan. the nuclear radiation contaminates food and another powerful aftershock rocks the area near that troubled power plant. >>> and comparisons to chernobyl. how does the japan nuclear crisis compare with the world's worst nuclear accident? we'll take you to chernobyl, some 25 years after that catastrophe. >>> good morning. welcome to "msnbc saturday." i'm alex witt. just past 9:00 on the east. 6:00 a.m. out west. what's happening for you. dramatic twists on the ground in libya are putting more fresher on international leaders to launch a military response. gadhafi's army rolled into the rebel stronghold of agabenghazi battling rebels in the street. >>> and secretary of state clinton meeting with officials about taking military action in libya. and jim maceda is with us from tripoli. get to benghazi. first up, called the rebel capital. what do we know about the situation there this morning? >> reporter: hi again, alex. the situation is not looking good at all for those rebels in their capitol and for the civilians. the people who live 670,000 of the
disaster in the making in japan after a new blast rocks a new power plant there. also a deadly tour bus crash in new york and conflicting reports from the driver and passengers. this while we try to get to the bottom of what really happened. and rebel fighters hammered in libya as forces loyal to qaddhafi use warplanes to bomb stra taoepbl i can conditions. it's all now and live and "happening now" "happening now." we're go glad you are with us on this very busy monday morning. hi, everybody i'm jenna lee? i'm jon scott. "happening now" a new explosion at a japanese nuclear power plant raises fears of an all out meltdown. the fallout from that could reach across the pacific affectth west coast of the u.s. more powerful after shocks rocked japan today. a thousand bodies wash ashore on the devastated northeast coast of the country. raising the death toll officially now lis listed as tad 9.0 and the tsunami that hit just half wards. the details get worse by the day. >> reporter: absolutely. it's completely unbelievable. every day i go out it gets worse than the day before. i went down by t
aftershocks. japan's index, the nikkei nose dived. the stock average fell 10.6%, down as much as 14% off one point during the day as worries of more reactor explosions increased. tokyo electric power stock, the owner of these reactors fell nearly 25% today. a look at our markets today, as you see, red arrows across the board. the dow jones down by 215 points. it's only 11:00 a.m. it's a reaction to what we have seen overseas and many market analysts did expect this. i'm thomas roberts. great to have you with me. japanese officials did raise the death toll to more than 2,700 people today but thousands more are still missing and boys continue to wash ashore. 400,000 people are homeless battling cold and windy conditions. nbc's ian williams is innia ma ga ta with the latest on the rescue and aid operations. >> good morning from yamagata air base where u.s. smirlt officers are in discussion about aid for survivors of the disaster. this could become a forward operating base for a major u.s. marine operation. we witnessed a navy c-130 transport aircraft fly in earlier. a heavy lift aircraft capabl
. and we will as well. >>> back to the story that -- the radiation from the fallout in that crisis in japan. the radiation has now reached southern california. but the u.s. officials are saying it's a billion times beneath the levels that would threaten anyone's health. japanese officials raised the fukushima accident level from four to five. that means they consider it on par with our own three mile island incident. frantic efforts continue to con taint situation at the daiichi plant. the u.s. military says japan requested an unmanned high altitude reconnaissance aircraft to fly over the troubled plant. that drone is equipped with infrared sensors that can take pictures and get a better understanding what's happening inside the reactor. >>> getting aid to northeastern japan has finally gotten easier. the port of sendai partially reopened. a ship brought in a large container of supplies for hundreds of thousands of people living in shelters. a small measure now of comfort exactly a week after the disaster struck. >>> a week ago today, people rushed out of buildings as a magnitude 9.0 earthq
and strong allies in japan, as they've come to terms and wrestled with this challenging situation. most of you know that our equipment that we sent over to support them has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people which were in addition to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions and mounted them, one on a fixed-wing aircraft and one on a helicopter and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we've been collecting information as they've come back. we're in the process of sharing that information with our japanese hosts and while that's still being looked at, preliminary indications are that they're consistent with the recommendations that came down from the nuclear regulatory commission. so indications are, it looks like the 50-mile evacuation was prudent. other countries around the world continue to do what they can do support the japanese as they lead this effort to address this challenge. we've had
at the pentagon. >>> let's go to japan where fears continue to spread, the death toll continues to client. today marks one week after the massive earthquake and the devastating tsunami which battered the country. 6,911 are confirmed dead and another 10,000 are still missing. survivors across japan observed a moment of silence today at the exact time that the quake struck. many still wearing face masks, many of them still in shock. a lot of the survivors are huddling in nearby shelters. japanese media reporting some 380,000 people in shelters. what makes matters worse, some of the shelters with without power and facing freezing temperatures. some survivors are returning home for the first time since the tsunami like this retired firefighter. he lost his home and entire family. >> translator: my wife, my son's family and four grandchildren. i lost them all. >> as for the nuclear crisis, things are not looking much better in fukushima. japan's nuclear agency raised the crisis level on the damaged planted there. you're looking at it, from a four to a five. that raises it to the same level as three m
. frightening moments for some workers at that troubled nuclear power plant in japan. what made them flee for their lives. >>> searching for spring. unseasonably cold weather puts a chill on the cherry blossoms and many areas of this country. >>> and summer breeze. why it might be a whole lot easier to find a summer job in twlechbt. >>> good morning, everyone, i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc sunday." let's get to what's happening right now beginning with new this morning. robert gates says the obama administration has no plans to remove gadhafi from power using military force. instead top u.s. officials are working diplomatic channels to try and push the dictator o. hiarcltoonme t a very clear message to gadhafi, but we're also sending a message to people around him. do you really want to be a pariah? do you really want to end up in the international criminal court? now is your time to get out of this and to help change the direction. >> mike viqueira, good sunday morning to you. >> reporter: good morning action al alex. >> what else are we hearing? >> reporter: critics say there's somet
now go to anderson cooper with "ac 360" live from japan. >>> piers, it is truly an extraordinary development to find somebody alive eight days, particularly remarkable when you consider so many of the injuries and the deaths we've seen were caused by that tsunami with all that debris and fast moving water. remarkable that this person apparently survived that long. and also with freezing cold temperatures at night. we'll try to find out more details on that. also the latest on the nuclear emergency that is ongoing right now. in the fukushima daiichi plant. the latest information on that is that the japanese government is finally admitting that the situation has indeed been worse than previously acknowledged. the government giving a grimmer assessment of the disaster, raising the threat level to level five out of seven, conceding it is worse than they previously said, something america's top nuclear regulator has been saying for two days. the wind had been blowing out to sea. it is now blowing on shore. we'll tell you what that means for cities like tokyo. according to "the new yor
radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? >>> plus with hispanics making up 1 in every 6 americans and one in every 1 ever 4 children, the huge emphasis on the 2012 election. >>> finally, how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard when people like michele bachmann, sarah palin and donald trump are taking up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent d geis bghi, afr heldg up of da. whatapnetoy t ou ilia atoue en >> reporter: today we went out of benghazi. and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajdabiya. ajdabiya is partially held by gadhafi forces and partially held by the rebels themselves. there is street-to-street fighting in the city. in a way, this is progress, the rebels would not have been able to get this far if gadha
since tuesday in libya could be released today if libyan officials are to be believed. >>> in japan today, the nuclear crisis is upgraded to level five as authorities try everything to avert a nuclear meltdown. the government now admits it is overwhelmed. >>> plus california lieutenant governor gavin newsom with us on his state's response to the quake and tsunami. >>> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. president obama will be delivering a statement on libya at 2:00 eastern at the white house after meeting with top lawmakers in the situation room. it will be the president's first comments since the u.n. authorized military intervention late last night. france and britain are making plans to send their jets to the region. italy has made its bases available. nato is meeting today in brussels to determine if it will lead any military operations against gadhafi's forces. today secretary clinton said that the world had no threat but to threaten gadhafi to stop his brutal crackdown against the rebels and libyan civilians. nbc's jim maceda is live in tripoli. we've heard so m
. we find ourselves with the world's most under reported story, a massive humanitarian crisis in japan caused by the quake and the following tsunami. what we could all be doing to help. dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. her morning begins with arthritis pain. that's a coffee and two pills. the afternoon tour begins with more pain and more pills. the evening guests arrive. back to sore knees. back to more pills. the day is done but hang on... her doctor recommended aleve. just 2 pills can keep arthritis pain away all day with fewer pills than tylenol. this is lara who chose 2 aleve and fewer pills for a day free of pain. and get the all day pain relief of aleve in liquid gels. and fewer pills for a day free of pain. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [ male announcer ] when you have plaque psoria
cuisinart. >> caught on air, disaster in japan, 11:00 p.m. eastern eastern on msnbc. you can have the last word online at our blog, and follow my tweets at lawrence. "the rachel maddow show" is up next. sitting in tonight, chris haze. good evening. >> good evening. thank you for staying with us the next hour. rachel has the night off. >>> the nuclear crisis in japan is still volatile tonight. there have been numerous developments today. we'll get to those shortly. we begin with something you should never have to ask, something that should never be a question. are we at war? yes, we are at war in iraq and afghanistan, and maybe sort of in pakistan as well. but are we at war again in another middle eastern country? it is not a provocative rhetorical question, it is one so-called no fly zone over libya and to take all necessary measures to protect civilians under attack. faced with threat from moammar gadhafi of a massacre of his own civilians, united nations approved military action against libya, which is a big fricking deal. for us, for the united nations, for the region. yet what
. the nuclear crisis in japan taking a new and potentially dangerous turn today. japan's nuclear safety agency warning the situation at the quake-damaged reactor, that it may not be under control. japanese engineers considering a last-ditch effort to prevent a full-scale meltdown. the government is calling it a race against time to prevent a cat traffic radiation leak that could affect millions of people. priority one, cooling the overheating fuel rods, trying to prevent a massive radiation leak. that may run into problems as well. trace gallagher has more. trace? >> reporter: experts have been saying for days that japan has been downplaying the severity of the crisis. they've upped the crisis from a four to a five. the country is saying they're overwhelmed and calling for the united states to help them stop this crisis. they've gotten some power to reactor 2. the hope is, they can use that power to turn on the cooling pump to get cool water on the reactors and spent fuel rods, but there's a problem. the l.a. times is reporting that nuclear regulatory commission believes the pool holding the s
bargaining law from taking effect and nuclear fallout from japan gets an upgrade. live from our studio in washington is special report. >> brett: u.s. ambassador susan rice says muammar khadafy is in violation of resolution that demanded a cease-fire in libya. they called on khadafy to halt military attacks on civilians and if the libyan leader does not stand down, the u.s. will launch military action against him. but he said the summit will not send ground troops into the country. we have team coverage. doug is at the pentagon with the u.s. role and logistics of implementing a no-fly zone. we begin with senior correspondent with rick leventhal who is live in libya in benghazi. >> reporter: it's safe to say that we've seen more check points popping up, more young men with small arms and concern about khadafy's army with libyan official on live television saying that the army was actually on the outskirts of this city, but was not planning to come in. this after reports that the cease-fire was followed by heavier fire from khadafy's army against civilians and soldiers rebel fighters. we
talking about the japan on the effect but now we're adding libya. >> there are so many periods of unrest all over the world but right now, i think wall street is focused on libya. probably it would have ended up higher if we know what was going to happen because a lot of people were afraid to put their money in, not knowing what was going to be happening but it is taking oil off the market. a lot of times when oil is off the market, oil will go up and so will gas prices. what we can expect from wall street is a lot of volatility. we're not going to see up, up or down, down, there are lots of reasons we should take a correction. s&p 500 is well above since december. >> heather: when you see the markets fluctuate according to large events, whether they be domestic or international, what affect does it have if any when you have so many events at once going on? >> the markets are going to be leading indicator, to be a fortune teller in a sense, priced in all of these things. it has been much more reactive of late. but has taken a positive stance toward japan. pretty positive stance to libya.
and bradley manning to the obvious. japan. how officials there ignored alarms about the possibility of a massive quake setting off a nuclear crisis that go back years. are these black swans that keep befalling us truly as unforeseen as everyone would want us to believe? how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com. plus, get the best deal or we'll pay you $1,000. call lending tree at... today. >>> turning our attention to japan, setbacks at the fukushima nuclear plant there. smoke started rising from reactor three amid fresh concerns about food and water supplies in the area. residents being warned not to drink the tap water and the government has banned shipments of milk and spinach from the region after radiation was detected but could all of this have been prevented? this man had been warnin
into an end game that doesn't overcommit us when we're already committed now? we've got this crisis in japan we're trying to help with, etc. so we are stretched thin. >> reporter: general and michael, thank you very much. >> thanks, shannon. >>> well, a leading figure of the libyan opposition movement has released a statement praising coalition forces for military action against qaddafi's regime. ththe pribs's family prince's fd from libya after the coup said the international community should help libya move forward. he said the libyan people cry out to the world to champion their rally for freedom and democracy. steve harrigan and rick leventhal have been provided around the clock coverage. steve was on the air as air strikes hit the area. you can follow that and catch all the developments in libya as military action continues. just log onto foxnews.com. >>> well, a glimmer of hope in such a tragic story in japan. an 80-year-old woman and a teenage boy were rescued from the wreckage of a house in northeastern japan nine days after a devastating earthquake and tsunami. both of them were wea
to the latest headlines out of japan, a measuring station in california has picked up radiation read innings the southern part of the state. a diplomat with access to the numbers says they are about a billion times beneath levels considered harmful to humans. and meantime, the crisis at the fukushima plant is getting worse. japanese authorities raise the accident rating from a 4 to a 5 after finding evidence of a partial meltdown in three of the reactor. a level 5 is the same classification as three mile island. japan's prime minister is asking the nation to come together to rebuild devastated areas. authorities say the number of confirmed dead is more than 6,900 and more than 10,000 people are missing. joining me now to talk about the latest developments in the nuclear crisis is arjoun makisani. arnie gunderson was an expert into the investigation of the three mile island accident. arnie, i'll start with you, now that we have this classification that puts japan at the same level as three mile island. >> this in my opinion is already worse than three mile island and should be a 6 instead of
of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way. how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard if people like michele bauchmann, sarah palin, and donald trump suck up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent richard engel is in benghazi after a heralding couple of days. what happened today on the ground in libya that you've seen? >> reporter: tdaye went out of benghazi and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajd
for wednesday, march 23rd. a lot to tell you, including fears about the safety of food coming out of japan as u.s. puts a halt on some imports. plus, look at the scene outside today. this is happening right for you. two days into spring and it's snowing across the northeast. we'll have the ugly forecast that spans not just from here but all the way across this country. >>> first let's get to the news at 30 rock in new york city. four days of allied strikes apparently battered moammar gadhafi's air force and largely destroyed his air defense systems. however, there's little evidence the attacks have stopped his forces from killing civilians or shifted the balance of power in favor of the rebels yet. yesterday's gadhafi's loyalists made advances on misrata, the last opposition-held city in gadhafi and ajdabiya. yesterday gadhafi appeared on television reportedly speaking from the same tripoli compound targeted by a coalition missile strike on sunday. remaining defiant, of course, saying we shall not surrender and fear passersby. we jeer at their missile. this assault is by a bunch of fashionists
at some point. thank you, william bratton for joiningus. >> can japan import enough bottled water to ease fears of nuclear contamination? >>> open court. chris brown says he's sorry about his latest outburst, but could his morning meltdown land him behind bars? >>> time for the "your business" entrepreneur of the week. beach volley players turned their passion into a year-round activity. they created the sand box in mystic, connecticut, the only indoor volleyball facility in new england. they're attracting players around the reege to this unique concept. watch "your business" sunday mornings 7:30 on msnbc. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] with amazing innovation, driven by relentless competition, wireless puts the world at your command. ♪ wireless puts the world at your command. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [scraping] [piano keys banging] [scraping] [horns honking] iteelie's holdyourarack. let me guess, 16. [laughing] yeeah. that's why there's castrol gtx... w
following general recommendations from the japan nuclear safety commission. >> we'll continue to follow it. >>> joining me to assess the situation in japan, nuclear fph frank von hippel. officials revealing a suspected breach in the reactor at the fukushima plant. this could mean a much more serious radioactive contamination that may be we haven't known so far exactly what's go on behind those walls there. but is it time to give up this battle, about cooling reactors and follow the lead in what they did in chernobyl, and that is to shut the plant down completely? >> no, they don't have the option of shutting it down. chernobyl was a very different situation. the core basically blew itself. a lot of the core blew into the atmosphere, and the rest melted down into the ground. and then they -- after a while they built this so-called sarcophagus to close it off. there's too much energy coming out of the fuel to walk away. they still have to keep trying to cool it. the problem is that we're now two weeks after the accident started and they haven't -- they don't have a handle on the situation ye
. >> in japan, at the pump for the troubled unit to treat reactor has been tested and is now working. they're not sure when it can be powered back up. black smoke billowed from the reactor unit prompting an evacuation of workers. meanwhile, officials in japan are urging tokyo residents not to hoard bottles of water after it was reduced that to water entered the water it is up to a hazardous amounts of radiation. >>mark: police and dog sniffing bonds were called to the sfo airport after a flight was making a landing. the flight was to coming from the philippines when the phone call was made to the cargo office. all 340 passengers were removed and taken to customs. the plane was searched but authorities did not find anything on board. >> coming up on kron4 news, more traffic and weather and will get you more information about the death of elizabeth taylor. first, i live look out side. hopefully, the rain has stopped if not more is on the way. >> considers harbert 2000 votes were destroyed or damaged in the port, it is about it at $200 loss in profits today. >>mark: we're also looking at a mu
have banned food coming from japan amid fears it's tainted with radiation. taiwan joins singapore, new zealand and the u.s. there's also concern about america's nuclear plants. there are 104 in the u.s. thethose plants. they explain almost 30% of those plants failed to report equipment defects that can pose, quote, substantial safety risks. according to the report, there were 24 such instances in a 10-month period between 2009 and 2010. the inspector general says it prevents regulators to learn about defects that could be cropping up at plants all across the country. so far the lapses haven't led to significant accidents. so far. but this is going to give you chills. it has to do with the bp oil accident in the coast of mexico. what they found is a crucial valve called a blowout preventer didn't work. it was supposed to seal off the pipe when there's pressure. instead they got jammed and left a 1.4 inch space. and all 4.9 million barrels of oil gushed through that space. and that's what caused the worst oil spill in u.s. history. they found it wasn't bp's fault, but a flaw in the desig
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26